King

King

I painted King for a wedding present for Mr & Mrs Jones.

Ota-juku (after Hiroshige)

Ota-jukuW

Acrylic polymer and watercolour on paper. 71x110cm. a collaboration in 35 parts. 2014

I was part of a collaboration between artists in Dubbo, Australia and Minokamo in Japan. My tile is the top right one. More info here.

The nature of creative collaboration is cohesive, and this aspect of the international works facilitated by Annette Simpson and myself in the Tracks exhibition generated a great deal of interest by the participating artists joining us from Japan. I proposed another work on the strength of that interest with a smaller pool of artists from the regional cities of Dubbo in Australia and Minokamo in Japan. To my delight the facilitator, Yumi Takeda, (and subsequently as guide and translator in Japan), proposed this historic Ukiyo-e image by Hiroshige.

Unlike the open international callout for “Oh, the River People” –the online piece from the Tracks program and “Read Between the Lines” facilitated by Annette, the participants in Ota-juku (after Hiroshige) were personally approached with skills and background in mind, by Yumi in Japan and myself in Australia.

That approach has produced a work of great deference and challenge in the re-imaging of this significant historical Edo period artwork.

The capacity for collaboration to forge new understandings is evident on many layers in this work. In one sense Ota-juku (after Hiroshige) refreshes an image heavily defined in its own historical context. The participants have also drawn their own straws on the personal value of that context. Each of the 35 parts of the work were produced in great faith, each artist working virtually blind to the intentions of the other artists, resulting in a Dadaist tapestry of creative consideration, goodwill and courage.

Jack Randell

Par

Par

This is Par, he lives in New Zealand.

Yawn

Yawn

A sleepy Chihuahua yawning away.

Charlie

Charlie

Charlie likes biting the postman and policemen.